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Новости / Поиск в новостях / New CPS 7.5 compressor for sandblasting expands Chicago Pneumatic offering in Europe

New CPS 7.5 compressor for sandblasting expands Chicago Pneumatic offering in Europe

2010-01-13

Antwerp – Chicago Pneumatic extends its compressor offering in Europe with the introduction of the new CPS 7.5 compressor. Delivering 7.6 m²/min (269 cfm) at 7 bar (102 psi) working pressure, this unit is designed for abrasive sandblasting, running pneumatic tools and general construction work.

The new CPS 7.5 extends the Chicago Pneumatic portable compressor range, which is ideally suited for construction site use. Reliability, easy maintenance and flexibility are the main characteristics of Chicago Pneumatic compressors. The range features robust German design, with powerful engines under sound and weatherproof hoods.

The small dimensions and light weight of the new CPS 7.5 model, featuring a Deutz engine, make the compressor perfectly suited to abrasive sandblasting, running pneumatic tools, and for general construction work. Its size allows the operator to easily transport and maneuver the compressor from one work point to another. With a full fuel tank the unit weighs 1475 kg (2950 lbs). It is 1.465 meters (57.7 inches) high, 1.680 meters (66.1 inches) wide and the length including the horizontal towbar is 4.365 meters (171.9 inches).

A fully galvanized canopy allows this unit to operate in a wide range of applications in the harshest of work environments.
 
Designed for true versatility and serviceability, the removable side panel provides exceptional access to all the service and maintenance points.  Several options, such as an aftercooler, lubricator and hose reels, allow the customer to easily adapt this unit to specific needs.

Contact: Elsie Vestraets, elsie.vestraets@cp.com, +32 (0)3 401. 98. 11
Images can be downloaded from the Chicago Pneumatic photo archive.